Client:

logo_filemaker

 

 

 

FileMaker Inc.

Date:

2008 – 2010

Goal:

Database creation for business professionals

Overview

FileMaker delivers innovative software to easily create custom business solutions for the iPad, iPhone, Windows, Mac and the web. I was brought on to design a new database solution for business professionals and individuals.

Interaction Modeling

My primary role at FileMaker was designing the interaction model for the overall product experience and each new feature. I was the frontrunner in the development process, taking a list of high-level requirements and working out potential process flows and designs for each new feature. I worked with stakeholders and engineers to fine-tune the designs and establish a balance between usability and feasibility. I maintained a click-through prototype to flesh out and communicate the details of each feature.

Usability Studies

Led multiple formal and informal usability studies, synthesized the results and incorporated feedback into feature designs. Through one-on-one interviews, I learned that a large majority of users imagined page layout while they were designing new database features. This led us to define a WYSIWYG database editor.

Another finding came during formal usability studies. Since a database product is so flexible it can seem quite amorphous to the average business professional, we found that presenting case studies helped users build an image of what could be done with the product and subsequently begin to imagine a solution for their particular needs.

Interface Design

Designed the look-and-feel to support the idea of a unique, easy-to-use, Apple-owned product. During the initial design phase, I created multiple designs for the look-and-feel of the product. We eventually decided on a very simple, approachable design with a unique look so that it would be easily recognizable. I also designed the interface so that it could be customizable by the end-user, making it uniquely fit their business or personal style and as a result heighten their sense of product ‘ownership.’